Category Archives: Uncategorized

Who Belongs on Our Streets?

The executive director of the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce, John Choe, was interviewed by Eater about the disappearance of street food in our community.

 John Choe walks down Main Street in Flushing, a neighborhood he’s lived and worked in for over a decade, he points out the different street corners where he and many others used to grab lunch. Here, one of the best ways to eat has always been on the street, where grilled meat skewers, Chinese barbecue, and sweet egg cakes have been sold from their respective corners for years.

But those vendors — who helped build the neighborhood’s reputation as a haven for the city’s best food — are now gone from their usual spots on Flushing’s busy main corridor. The corner of 39th Avenue and Main, once home to juicy lamb skewers and a vendor selling “golden eggies,” is now empty, and over on 38th Avenue, a popular Chinese barbecue cart is also gone.

The vendor-free streets are a result of a controversial city-backed street vendor ban that went into effect earlier this year. Though billed as a way to alleviate sidewalk congestion and pollution, many say the ban was driven by the luxurifying of downtown Flushing, which is now home to multi-million dollar condos, glitzy new shopping malls, and an increasingly wealthy population.

“I spoke with all the vendors directly, and many of them were heartbroken,” says Choe, executive director of the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce. “I know at least one that had been here for more than 10 years.”

Incidentally, despite the ban, some unlicensed vendors are still setting up shop in the neighborhood; these vendors aren’t registered with the city, making it harder for officials to find and cite them for violations. On a recent afternoon, a clothing seller stood at 41st Avenue and Main, taking over the space where a skewer vendor once stood. The result, Choe says, is that the ban ends up mostly impacting vendors who are trying to do business legally.

“It’s a bitter irony that the people who invested time and resources into becoming fully compliant with city rules are the ones that have been kicked out,” he says.

 
 

To read more about this issue, visit Eater.

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Interfaith Unity Walk 2019

Diversity Thrives in the Birthplace of Religious Freedom

In 1657, the farmers of Flushing courageously stood up for our freedom of conscience (telling Governor Stuyvesant that the “law of love, peace and liberty in the states extend[s] to Jews, Turks and Egyptians”). Since then, religious freedom has become a bedrock of our society and we have all benefited from this legacy of peaceful coexistence. Flushing, now has the highest concentration of religious from around the world — Sikhs, Baptists, Jews, Catholics, Muslims, Quakers, and dozens of other faiths have figured out how to live together side by side.

Please join the Flushing Interfaith Council on Saturday, October 19, 1:00pm, as we celebrate our religious diversity during our annual Queens Interfaith Unity Walk! We will gather at St. George’s Church on Main Street and 38th Avenue in downtown Flushing, NY 11354.

You are invited – meet your neighbors!

Flushing Interfaith Council
Annual Interfaith Unity Walk
Saturday, October 19, 1:00pm

People of all faiths will gather to walk together in the most religiously diverse neighborhood in America during the Annual Queens Interfaith Unity Walk on Saturday, October 19, 1-4pm, to visit the many different houses of worship in Queens and learn about the faith of their neighbors. The Unity Walk will start 1:00pm at historic Saint George’s Church, located at 135-32 38th Avenue in downtown Flushing, Queens.

“The relevance and importance of our Unity Walk stems from the rising number of hate crimes in our society. In a divided world of ‘us’ vs. ‘them,’ the very notion of ‘other’ needs to be shattered if we are to prevent future acts of bigotry,” stated Harpreet Singh Wahan of the Sikh Center of New York. “Our Unity Walk recognizes all humanity as one – ‘Let there be no strangers’ – through respect and mutual coexistence, we can ensure a better and safer world for all of us.”

The Queens Interfaith Unity Walk arose in response to post-9/11 challenges and developed from a model in Brooklyn called “Children of Abraham Peace Walk,” which has been bringing churches, mosques, and synagogues together for more than a decade. The Queens event includes non-Abrahamic religious groups as well as a number of faiths reflecting the incredibly diverse cultures of Flushing.

“Though I look forward to this event every year, it is not only a ‘feel good’ event. Queens is highly diverse and has experienced some tensions and violence targeting that diversity,” stated Adem Carroll of the Muslim Progressive Traditionalist Alliance. “We all need to show our solidarity and I hope the people of Queens will come and walk the Walk with us.”

In addition to St. George’s Church, participants will visit the Sikh Center of New York at 38-17 Parsons Boulevard, the Muslim Center of New York at 13764 Geranium Ave, and Temple Gates of Prayer at 3820 Parsons Blvd. The Unity Walk will conclude at the Hindu Temple Society at 45-57 Bowne Street with light refreshments. At each stop, members of the respective faith will highlight important religious beliefs and traditions.

The Queens Interfaith Unity Walk is sponsored by the Flushing Interfaith Council, which includes the Flushing Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, the Bahá’í Community of Queens, the Free Synagogue of Flushing, the Hindu Temple Society of North America, the Muslim Progressive Traditionalist Alliance, Pax Christi Queens, the Sikh Center of New York, the Eckankar Community of Queens, and the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Queens. For more information about the Flushing Interfaith Council, please visit flushinginterfaithcouncil.wordpress.com.

For more information, contact the Flushing Interfaith Council at FlushingInterfaithCouncil@gmail.com or (646) 926-7844 or https://www.facebook.com/flushinginterfaith.

The Flushing Interfaith Council works to help build and foster understanding and common ground among various faith traditions in our community. For the past eight years, participants of the Interfaith Unity Walk have gathered and walked in the neighborhoods of Flushing, Queens, one of the largest and most diverse communities in New York City.

All are welcome!

Co-sponsored by the Free Synagogue of Flushing, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Queens, the Sikh Center of New York, Flushing Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), Muslim Progressive Traditionalist Alliance, Pax Christi Metro New York, Morningside Quaker Meeting, St. George’s Church of Flushing, the Bahá’í Faith Community in Queens, and Eckankar Community of Queens. Endorsed by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (New York Chapter), Flushing Jewish Community Council, the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce, Queens Counseling Services of the Foundation for Religion and Mental Health, Turning Point for Women and Families, and Women for Afghan Women.

Our goal is to build bridges of love and understanding within our community.

Please join us!

At some houses of worship, all are asked to take off their shoes and women are asked to cover their heads, so wear socks you’d like to be seen in and women are asked to please bring along a scarf.

Find Yourself Here!

#FlushingFantastic

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Find The Silver Lining

Find the Silver Lining
by Rock Thomas

One day at the salon, Rock Thomas’ hairdresser let him know he was losing his hair. It wasn’t a standard case of male pattern hair loss – in fact, the stylist told Thomas that he needed to go to the doctor to get it checked out.

The news Thomas received from his doctor initially devastated him, but instead of wallowing in his embarrassment, he found a way to move on … with a positive mindset.

Watch this Goalcast video, How to Find the Silver Lining in Anything, to learn more about his journey, including the question he asks in every bad situation: “What’s great about this?”

About Schooley Mitchell

Schooley Mitchell is the largest independent cost reduction consulting firm in North America, with offices from coast-to-coast in the United States and Canada. https://www.schooleymitchell.com/

About The Greater Flushing Chambers of Commerce

The Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce is a multicultural membership association of entrepreneurs and civic leaders representing the most diverse community in New York.  The Chamber fosters the economic growth, inclusive diversity, and shared prosperity of greater Flushing through advocacy, networking, and education. More information is available at flushingchamber.nyc.

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Join this Seminar to Learn More About The Impacts Of Human Trafficking

Please join us at the Flushing Library this Friday at 6 p.m. to learn about human trafficking and how this issue impacts our community. Presenters will include NYPD, Mayor’s Office to End Domestic and Gender-Based Violence and Garden of Hope who will talk about different resources like counseling, job training and shelter services available to trafficking victims and to those in need of a safe space to rebuild their lives.

 

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Sign Up For A Free Mental Health First Aid Training Session!

Queensboro Hill Flushing Civic Association is teaming up with Green Earth Urban Gardens Inc to create a Mental Health First Aid Training program that helps you recognize the signs and symptoms of mental illness and substance abuse. You will learn how to listen without judgement, respond to, and help someone in distress until they can get the professional care they may need.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

 

At least 1 in 5 New York City Adults is likely to experience a mental health disorder in any given year. In order to build a more supportive and inclusive community, it is important to know how to respond in a crisis.

This free training course will be held on February 23rd, 2019 from 9:15 am – 5:15 pm. It will be located at 41-60 Main Street, 3rd Floor, Room 311, Flushing, 11355. For more information and registration, click here.

About the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce

 The Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce is a multicultural membership association of entrepreneurs and civic leaders representing the most diverse community in New York.  The Chamber fosters the economic growth, inclusive diversity, and shared prosperity of greater Flushing through advocacy, networking, and education. More information is available at flushingchamber.nyc.

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Roosevelt Avenue Bridge Notice

Beginning Tuesday, December 4 through the morning of Saturday, December 8, 2018, the NYC Department of Transportation Division of Bridges will close the single eastbound lane of the Roosevelt Avenue Bridge between 126th Street and Janet Place. Lanes on the bridge have already been reduced to two lanes due to Stage 1 construction– as a result, only one lane of westbound traffic will be allowed during this period. Be sure to plan your commute accordingly!!

Please refer to the image below for more information.

About Department of Transportation

DOT’s mission is to provide for the safe, efficient, and environmentally responsible movement of people and goods in the City of New York and to maintain and enhance the transportation infrastructure crucial to the economic vitality and quality of life.

About the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce

 The Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce is a multicultural membership association of entrepreneurs and civic leaders representing the most diverse community in New York.  The Chamber fosters the economic growth, inclusive diversity, and shared prosperity of greater Flushing through advocacy, networking, and education. More information is available at flushingchamber.nyc.

 

 

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